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Hike in Whistler & Garibaldi Provincial ParkHike in Squamish & Garibaldi Provincial ParkHike in VancouverHike in Tofino & ClayoquotHike in Victoria & Vancouver IslandHike the West Coast Trail WCT

The hilariously adorable little cabin near Virgin Falls that can be used by anyone and sits at the end of a short side road definitely requires a good 4x4 to reach.  But as it is only about 400 metres from the Virgin Falls road, you can park and walk to it if needed.  There are two excellent pullout/turn around points on this short road as well in case you chicken out and want to turn around part way in.

We Deliver to Rubble Creek

Kennedy River BridgeThe little Virgin Falls cabin is quite amazing for such a remote place.  First off, the setting is fantastic.  It is located overlooking the beautiful Tofino Creek, and there is a wonderful campfire spot complete with log seats, just steps from the cabin.  The cabin itself is equipped with a wood stove and bunk beds.

You could easily have 8 people stay and sleep fairly comfortably as there are six bunks and floor room.  There are several empty and partly empty booze bottles lining the shelves as well as quite a few odd curiosities in the little cabin.  If you are brave enough to drive right to the cabin there is room for several vehicles to park and not obstruct anyone's exit.

The Virgin Falls cabin even has pots and pans for use with the stove and working lanterns and some fantastically kind people have generously equipped it with lots of cut firewood.  There is a funny sign on the door declaring that the cabin is for everyone and despite its shabby appearance you get the impression that this cabin on Tofino Creek near Virgin Falls has been well used and well loved for decades.

Narrow Road to Virgin FallsThough you have to travel a network of logging roads to reach Virgin Falls it is surprisingly easy to find them.  The start of the Virgin Falls Road is immediately after the famous Kennedy River bridge.  The focal point of the hugely publicized logging protests in 1993 where hundreds were arrested for blockading logging vehicles.  The Kennedy River bridge is worth a look.  It spans the Kennedy River above the original and now crumbling, wooden bridge.  The current one is a massive, solid steel bridge above the old one.  You can still see some where protesters attempted to burn the bridge down.  Several wooden pilings are severely burned under the bridge.

This bridge is also the gateway to Kennedy River Bog Provincial Park.  There are no trails so access is via boat underneath the Kennedy River bridge.  Visitors to this park generally park at the Kennedy Lake bridge just a couple kilometres past this bridge where there is an extensive camping area on the nice, sandy beach.  Unfortunately that bridge is falling apart and therefore barricaded.  So, at least on wheels, that is, it is the end of the road.

Little House Near Virgin FallsTo get to the Kennedy River bridge from the highway is easy.  From the T junction where you either go to Tofino or Ucluelet or Port Albernie, drive for a couple kilometres in the direction of Port Albernie.  Keep your eyes out on your left for the very visible, West Main logging road.  Follow it for about 11k until you cross the large Kennedy River bridge.  About 50 metres past it you will see the road branch off to the left unmarked but called the Deer Bay Rd on Google maps, but locally known as the Virgin Falls road.  (see Google Map below for this turnoff).

Set your odometer to zero and follow this road (bearing left at the Y junction a few minutes in) for 31k.  At 31k you will see Virgin Falls from the road, and about 100 metres after seeing it on your left you will spot the very visible trailhead on your left and a slight widening of the road to possibly accommodate two or three vehicles.  The trail to the falls is less than a minute long.  The very visible but overgrown road you passed at around 28k on your left is the short road to the little cabin on the river.  This is yet another unmaintained and evidently free backcountry camping option.  The water is safe for drinking but there are no pit toilets for several dozen kilometres.

 

Five Days Hiking in Clayoquot Sound Day 4 - Radar Beach

Radar Beach is a beautiful set of three beaches at the end of a difficult hike from the Radar Hill parking lot.  Because they are difficult to get to and not on the main tourism maps, they are rarely visited.  Though the trail is just over one kilometre long, it will likely take you almost an hour to hike due to its steep and winding course.  It is well worn and easy to follow, though after dark it would be almost impossible to follow without lights.

Once you reach the sand you come to a massive, beautiful beach arching in both directions to rocky outcrops.  To the left you will find two smaller beaches and steep Unmarked Trailhead to Radar Beach in Tofinoheadlands.  Depending on the tide you may be unable to get past the headlands blocking the further beaches.  But if you don't mind some scrambling over steep terrain and thick foliage you will find some breathtaking and even more secluded pocket beaches to put up your prohibited tent for an unforgettable night in paradise.

If you plan on staying past dusk, remember not to bring your car as the gates shut after dark.  Hitchhike or take a short taxi ride from Tofino.  The unmarked trailhead is very easy to find.  Turn off of the highway at the Sign for Radar Hill and follow the road straight to the end (do not turn right into the parking lot closest to the Radar Hill Lookout trail).

At the parking area, you will see a washroom a few dozen metres to your right, but looking instead to your left you will see a trail disappear into the trees.  Follow this and after 15 metres you will see the sign saying that it is a dangerous, unmaintained trail and camping is prohibited.  The hike to the beach takes 30 minutes to an hour depending on your speed.  You can avoid the muddy sections with some agility, so no hiking shoes necessary.  Try to avoid hiking this trail after dark if you can.

We Deliver to Rubble Creek

 

Five Days Hiking in Clayoquot Sound Day 5 - Lone Cone

Lone Cone is the wonderful cone shaped mountain that dominates the skyline in Tofino.  It is just 6k from Tofino on the north-western end of Meares Island.  Lone Cone is an incredible hike to do while in Tofino.  There are several attributes that make it fantastic.  First, its location.  Very close to Tofino.  Just a short and very scenic boat taxi takes you to the trailhead.

In the 15 minute, fast taxi, you will see a quick look at the spectacular scenery that has made Tofino famous.  Small and large islands crammed almost solid with beautifully huge trees.  Sandy beaches that make you think more that you are in Hawaii than in Canada.  Abrupt, rocky outcrops with chaotic, swirling, clear and green water that the boat taxi/tour guide continuously points to unexpectedly beautiful creatures lurking in.  Then you look up in the trees and spot a resident eagle staring menacingly down from a tree branch next to its nest full of offspring.  And that's just the first five minutes from the pier.

15 minutes from the pier you arrive at the grungy, though at the same time, beautiful pier at the now abandoned Kakawis.  There are still a few dozen houses that line the gravel road you will see as you make your way to the trailhead.  A resident caretaker still has a boat at the dock, though you will probably not encounter him.  You may read in current Tofino guidebooks that you must call ahead to gain permission to cross this private land to access the trailhead is well out of date and obsolete.  If you encounter an emergency on the Lone Cone hike there is excellent cell phone reception from almost anywhere on the trail except a few spotty areas.  In an absolute emergency the caretaker may assist you, if you can locate him in the Kakawis village.

Aerial Views of Whistler & Garibaldi Park

Drop Off Pier to the Lone Cone Trailhead

From the pier you follow the gravel road which seems to take you further from Lone Cone.  About five minutes down this road you will see the houses of Kakawis on your right, and keeping on the gravel road you will soon see the large "Lone Cone" sign pointing you left to the very well marked trail into the deep forest and muddy first section of the trail.

Though there has been a fair amount of mud avoiding constructions you still might get a bit muddy here.  Though you can hop from one tree root to another fairly effectively, a couple slips and stumbles may get you wet and dirty.

1.2k into the hike (from the pier), you finally begin ascending.  Slowly at first then at 1.8k steeper and steeper.  From this point until the end of the trail the hike averages about 45 degrees!  Lone Cone is, near and at the top, quite massive.  And though the marked trail ends and the amazing views the exploring has just begun.  You could wander for hours through the forest at the top, however, the viewpoints on the marked trail are hard to beat.

At the main viewpoint the is a small and evidently well used place for a fire right at the edge of the cliff.  This area also, if you were inclined, have room for a tent or two, though you read at the trailhead that camping is prohibited.  There are several suitable places to put your tent if you are keen further into the bush past this viewpoint.  There are obviously no facilities or charge for Lone Cone except for the cost of the water taxi to and from the hike.

Lone Cone End of Trail View - Vancouver Hiking Guide August

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